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Keynote Lectures

Nonlinear, Tunable and Light-Emitting All-Dielectric Metasurfaces
Isabelle Staude, Institute of Applied Physics, Abbe Center of Photonics, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany

Optical Tweezers on Nanostructures
Onofrio M. Maragò, CNR-IPCF, Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Messina, Italy

Infrared Signatures of Interactions between Molecules and Free Charge Carriers in Nanostructures
Annemarie Pucci, University of Heidelberg, Germany

Ultrafast dynamics of two-dimensional materials
Giulio Cerullo, Politecnico di Milano, Italy

 

Nonlinear, Tunable and Light-Emitting All-Dielectric Metasurfaces

Isabelle Staude
Institute of Applied Physics, Abbe Center of Photonics, Friedrich Schiller University Jena
Germany
 

Brief Bio
Jun.-Prof. Dr. Isabelle Staude studied physics at the University of Konstanz, and subsequently received her Ph.D. degree from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany, in 2011. For her postdoc, she moved to the Nonlinear Physics Centre, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, where she coordinated the experimental activities on optical nanoantennas and served the nanoplasmonics stream in the Australian Centre of Excellence CUDOS as deputy project leader. She returned to Germany in mid-2015 to establish a junior research group on functional photonic nanostructures at the Institute of Applied Physics and the Abbe Center of Photonics at Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany. She received an Emmy-Noether Grant from the German research Foundation as well as the Hertha Sponer Prize 2017 from the German Physical Society. In November 2017, she became a junior professor at the same institution.


Abstract
Optically resonant dielectric metasurfaces have been established as a versatile platform for manipulating light fields at the nanoscale. While initial research efforts were concentrated on purely passive structures, all-dielectric metasurfaces also hold a huge potential for dynamic control of light fields, as well as for tailoring light emission processes, such as spontaneous emission and nonlinear frequency generation. This talk will review our recent advances in nonlinear, tunable and light-emitting all-dielectric metasurfaces, and outline future research directions for next-generation metasurface architectures.



 

 

Optical Tweezers on Nanostructures

Onofrio Maragò
CNR-IPCF, Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Messina
Italy
 

Brief Bio
Onofrio M. Maragò studied Physics at the University of Pisa (Italy) and received his DPhil at the Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford (UK), working on Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity of ultra-cold atoms. Since 2002 he is Research Scientist at Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici of the Italian National Research Council (CNR-IPCF) in Messina, Italy. His research interests are related to optical trapping, manipulation, and characterization of micro and nanoparticles, for applications in nanoscience, photonics, and soft-matter. He co-authored the textbook “Optical Tweezers: Principles and Applications”, P. H. Jones, O. M. Maragò, G. Volpe, Cambridge University Press (2015). He serves as Advisor for the “Messina OSA Student Chapter” and the “EPS Messina Young Minds Group” promoting topical seminars, meetings, and outreach activities. 



Abstract
Mechanical effects of light are a consequence of conservation laws in light scattering. Optical tweezers, tools based on strongly focused light, enables optical trapping and manipulation of a wide range of microscopic and nanoscopic materials, as well as their characterization. When used as force transducer, they are capable of femtonewton force sensing in photonic force and torque microscopy. For non-spherical particles or at intermediate (meso)scale regimes, shape, aggregation, and composition can have dramatic consequences for optically trapped particle dynamics. Here, after an introduction to optical forces at the mesoscale, we give an overview of results on optical trapping, optical binding, and characterization of 1D (silicon and zinc oxide nanowires) and 2D materials with a focus on scaling laws. Furthermore, we give an overview of applications of optical forces on plasmonic and hybrid particles where surface-enhanced Raman scattering enables ultra-sensitive spectroscopy of biomolecules in liquids.



 

 

Infrared Signatures of Interactions between Molecules and Free Charge Carriers in Nanostructures

Annemarie Pucci
University of Heidelberg
Germany
 

Brief Bio
Annemarie Pucci (Lehmann) studied physics in Jena, Germany. Her doctorate studies at the university of Rostock were dedicated to the theory of optical phonons of disordered materials. Already as postdoc she started with infrared analytics of thin layers, which she later on continued at the university in Jena and, as guest researcher, in Troitzk/Moscow (ISAS), Tübingen (university), and Stuttgart (MPI-FKF). Before becoming a university professor for experimental physics in Heidelberg in 1995, she started doing surface science and He-atom scattering experiments at the physics department of the FU Berlin. Her research in Heidelberg is concentrated on studies of infrared excitations of surfaces, nanostructures, and thin layers from various inorganic and organic materials with focus on the couplings of different excitation types.  She was the first who explained surface enhanced infrared absorption as a Fano-type effect related to plasmonic excitations. At the university of Heidelberg, Annemarie Pucci gives lectures on condensed matter physics, optical properties of condensed matter, and surface science. Her research projects included surface science, infrared plasmonics, bio-photonics, laboratory astronomy, organic electronics, and low-dimensional electron systems.


Abstract
Vibrational excitations which are coupled to electronic resonances in the infrared, for example plasmonic ones of nanostructures, show up as Fano-type lines the asymmetry and the oscillor strenth of which are determined by the details of the coupling. For certain situations, in surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) based on plasmon-polariton resonances, vibrational signals become extraordinarily enhanced, which supports sensing of tiny molecular amounts and of nanoparticles with chemical identification. During the last decade the sensitivity and the applicability of such plasmonic sensors has been continuosly improved. Besides those interesting developments that mainly look at the enhanced vibrational signal also the change of the plasmonic signal itself upon the adsorbtion of molecules contains valuable information, for example on charge transfer. Furthermore, adsorbates change the electronic surface resitivity and thus the plasmonic line width of nanostructure resonances. In low dimensional structures where plasmonic resonances depend on the confinement of the electronic wave function, the push-back effect from adsorbates appears as a resonance shift.



 

 

Ultrafast dynamics of two-dimensional materials

Giulio Cerullo
Politecnico di Milano
Italy
 

Brief Bio
Giulio Cerullo is a Full Professor with the Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, where he leads the Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy laboratory. Prof. Cerullo’s research activity covers a broad area known as “Ultrafast Optical Science”, and concerns on the one hand pushing our capabilities to generate and manipulate ultrashort light pulses, and on the other hand using such pulses to capture the dynamics of ultrafast events in bio-molecules, nanostructures and two-dimensional materials (graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides). He has published more than 450 papers which have received more than 19000 citations (H-index: 73). He is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America and of the European Physical Society and Chair of the Quantum Electronics and Optics Division of the European Physical Society. He is the recipient of an ERC Advanced Grant (2012-2017) on two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of biomolecules. He is on the Editorial Advisory Board of the journals Optica, Laser&Photonics Reviews, Scientific Reports, Chemical Physics, Journal of Raman spectroscopy. He is General Chair of the conferences CLEO/Europe 2017, Ultrafast Phenomena 2018 and the International Conference on Raman Spectroscopy 2020. 


Abstract
Layered materials are solids consisting of crystalline sheets with strong in-plane covalent bonds and weak van der Waals out-of-plane interactions. These materials can be easily exfoliated to a single layer (1L), obtaining two-dimensional (2D) materials with radically novel physico-chemical characteristics compared to their bulk counterparts. The field of 2D materials began with graphene and quickly expanded to include semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). 2D materials exhibit very strong light-matter interaction and exceptionally intense nonlinear optical response, enabling a variety of novel applications in optoelectronics and photonics. This talk will review our studies on the non-equilibrium and nonlinear optical response of 2D materials. We will discuss ultrafast carrier and spin dynamics in 2D semiconductors and their heterostructures. We will also show gate-tunable absorption saturation and third-harmonic generation in 1L-graphene and optical parametric amplification in 1L-TMDs.



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