PRIMORIS      Contacts      FAQs      INSTICC Portal
 

Keynote Lectures

Photon Wave Fronts - Frontiers in Photonics
David Andrews, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom

Multifunctional Nanoscale Oxide Conductors and Semiconductors
Elvira Fortunato, CENIMAT/I3N/FCT/UNL, Portugal

Simply..circumventing the Diffraction Limit - Fluorescence Optical Microscopy at the Nanoscale
Alberto Diaspro, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Italy

Dielectric Waveguide Amplifiers and Lasers
Markus Pollnau, University of Twente, Netherlands

Cells as Bits - Biomedical Diagnostics Inspired by Data Communication Techniques
Bahram Jalali, UCLA, United States

 

Photon Wave Fronts - Frontiers in Photonics

David Andrews
University of East Anglia
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
David Andrews is Professor of Chemical Physics at the University of East Anglia, where his group conducts research on fundamental photonics, optomechanical forces, optical vortices, nonlinear optics, energy harvesting and molecular energy transport.  He has a dozen books and 300 research papers to his name.  David Andrews is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society of Chemistry, and SPIE - the international optics and photonics society.


Abstract
Advances in photonics are bringing the fundamental nature and properties of the photon under fresh scrutiny.  Numerous developments in the field of optical vortices, plasmonics and nonlinear optics hinge on exotic properties of the wave-front and phase structures of light, down to the level of the photon itself.  As a result we are discovering new fundamental principles, and finding new applications ranging including nanomanipulation, quantum information and all-optical switching. This address highlights some of the latest discoveries.



 

 

Multifunctional Nanoscale Oxide Conductors and Semiconductors

Elvira Fortunato
CENIMAT/I3N/FCT/UNL
Portugal
 

Brief Bio
Elvira Fortunato is Professor of Materials Science at the Faculty of Sciences and Technology of Universidade Nova de Lisboa. Fortunato pioneered European research on transparent electronics, namely thin-film transistors based on oxide semiconductors, demonstrating that oxide materials may be used as true semiconductors. In 2008 she wins an Advanced Grant from ERC for the project “Invisible”. Director of the Materials Research Center. Director of the PhD program in Micro and Nanotechnologies Engineering. Associate editor of Pysica Status Solidi Rapid Research Letters, Wiley. Co-Editor of Europhysics Letters. Member of the Advisory Editorial Board of Applied Surface Science. Member of the National Scientific and Technological Council. Member of “Academia de Engenharia”, Portugal.


Abstract
Metal oxide materials are an old class of materials but represent today a revolutionary idea highlighted by the recent demonstrations of invisible transistors leading to worldwide interest in what is called “Transparent Electronics”. Metal oxide conductors/semiconductors exhibit an intriguing combination of high optical transparency, high electron mobility, and in some cases amorphous microstructures. Other advantages include low temperature deposition routes and ultra-smooth surfaces for suppressing interface traps and scattering centers. In this presentation we will present some highlights developed in our laboratory concerning the following topics: (i) n- and p-type TFTs; (ii) Integrated circuits; (iii) Paper electronics (iv) Biosensors (v) Electrochromic devices and (iv) Photodiodes, all of them based on metal oxide conductors and semiconductors.



 

 

Simply..circumventing the Diffraction Limit - Fluorescence Optical Microscopy at the Nanoscale

Alberto Diaspro
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia
Italy
 

Brief Bio

Director - Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia AD born in Genoa, Italy, on April 7, 1959, received his Laurea in Electronic Engineering in 1983, Univ.of Genoa. Dir. Nanophys at Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), Deputy Director of IIT, Prof. Appl. Phys. at Univ.of Genoa. President of Optics Within Life Sciences, IEEE Senior member and Editor in chief of Microscopy Research and Technique (7/2013). Pubs > 250, H=29, cit > 3000. Research development of instrumentation for apps in biophysics and biomedical engineering. (http://www.iit.it/en/naph-people/nanophysics-optical-nanoscopy/department-director/alberto-diaspro.html)


Abstract

It is well known and established that, for the most popular imaging mode in optical microscopy, i.e. fluorescence, the diffraction barrier does no longer provide an unsurpassable limitation for resolution and localization accuracy. Terms lil “super resolution” and  "optical nanoscopy", coined earlier, have been implemented in real far field optical microscopes taking advantage on the knowledge of the photo physics of the labelling molecules. We  will discuss both targeted and stochastic readout methods using both one- and two-photon  excitation(2PE)/absoprtion, in terms of resolution and localization precision accuracy. Individual molecule localization (IML) implemented within selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) will be addressed towards 3D super resolution imaging in thick biological samples including non linear photo-activation. 2PE-STED microscopy will be discussed reporting about the utilization of  a single wavelength (SW) both for 2PE and fluorescence depletion. A variety of architectures will be outlined and further variations on the super resolution theme addressed. (LANIR FP7 Nanoscopy Project (NMP4-SE-2012-280804)).



 

 

Dielectric Waveguide Amplifiers and Lasers

Markus Pollnau
University of Twente
Netherlands
 

Brief Bio
Markus Pollnau received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from the Univ. of Hamburg, Germany in 1992 and the Univ. of Bern, Switzerland in 1996, respectively. After positions with the Univ. of Southampton, the Univ. of Bern, and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, he became a Full Professor at the Univ. of Twente, The Netherlands. He has contributed to more than 500 reviewed journal and international conference papers and ten book chapters in the fields of crystal and thin-film growth, rare-earth-ion spectroscopy, solid-state and fiber lasers, and waveguide fabrication, devices, and applications. Dr. Pollnau served as Program and General Co-chair of the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (2006/2008) and the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe (2009/2011), founding General Chair of the Europhoton Conference (2004), as well as Topical Editor for the Journal of the Optical Society of America B (2007-2010).


Abstract
The performance of semiconductor amplifiers and lasers has made them the preferred choice for optical gain on a micro-chip. In the past few years, we have demonstrated that also rare-earth-ion-doped dielectric waveguides show remarkable performance, ranging from a small-signal gain per unit length of 1000 dB/cm, via integrated distributed-feedback lasers with ultra-narrow linewidths in the 1-kHz range, to 1.6 W of output power from a fundamental-mode channel waveguide laser with a slope efficiency exceeding 80%. These performance parameters, combined with the distinct advantages of rare-earth ions, their long emission lifetimes, temporally and spatially stable gain, high-speed amplification into the Tb/s regime, reduced time jitter in ultrafast-pulse generation, and reasonably low heat generation, make these dielectric devices viable alternatives that can easily compete with the common semiconductor devices.



 

 

Cells as Bits - Biomedical Diagnostics Inspired by Data Communication Techniques

Bahram Jalali
UCLA
United States
 

Brief Bio
Bahram Jalali is the Northrop-Grumman Endowed Chair in Optoelectronics and Professor of Electrical Engineering at UCLA, the Director of Department’s Physical and Wave Electronics, with joint appointments in Biomedical Engineering, California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) and Department of Surgery at the UCLA School of Medicine. He received his Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Columbia University in 1989 and was with Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey until 2002 before joining UCLA. He is a Fellow of IEEE, the Optical Society of America (OSA), and the American Physical Society (APS). He is the recipient of the R.W. Wood Prize from Optical Society of America for the invention and demonstration of the first Silicon Laser, and the Aron Kressel Award of the IEEE Photonics Society, and the Distinguished Engineering Achievement Award from the Engineers Council. In 2005 he was elected into the Scientific American Top 50, and received the BrideGate 20 Award in 2001 for his entrepreneurial accomplishments. He has published over 300 journal and conference papers, and holds 11 patents. During 2001-2004, he was a consultant at Intel Corporation’s optical and wireless communication divisions.


Abstract
Telecommunication systems routinely generate, capture and analyze data at rates exceeding billions of bits per second.  Interestingly, the scale of the problem is similar to that of blood analysis. With approximately 1 billion cells per milliliter of blood, detection of a few abnormal cells in a blood sample translates into a “cell error rate” of 10-12, a value strangely similar to the bit error rate in telecommunication systems.
Motivated by WDM and time-stretch dispersive Fourier transform technologies, a new type of bright-field imaging known as STEAM has demonstrated imaging of cells with record shutter speed and throughput leading to detection of rare breast cancer cells in blood with one-in-a-million sensitivity. A second technique called FIRE is a new approach to fluorescent imaging that is based on wireless communication techniques. FIRE has achieved real-time pixel readout rates one order of magnitude faster than the current gold standard in high-speed fluorescence imaging.
Finally, a new physics-based signal transformation will be introduced and demonstrated. The Anamorphic Stretch Transform enables a digitizer to capture signals that would otherwise be beyond its bandwidth and at the same time, it compresses the digital data volume. This method is inspired by operation of Fovea centralis in the human eye and by anamorphic transformation in visual arts. The Anamorphic Stretch Transform makes it possible to (i) capture high-throughput random signals in real-time and (ii) to alleviate the storage and transmission bottlenecks associated with the resulting “big data”.



footer